Impact of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) on our metabolic health

This post was written by a student in Lynn Reid’s Writing for the Sciences class at the City College of New York. After researching a scientifically debatable topic and writing about it for an audience of academic peers, this assignment asks students to present a multi-modal argument of the same topic to a popular audience.

Impact of high fructose corn syrup

My name is Debdarshan Nath. I am a student of city college. The main argument of my hybrid essay was to inform others about the harmful impact of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) on our metabolic health. I started my essay by defining high fructose corn syrup and then including the present statistics of HFCS consumption. After that I listed each risk factor separately to clarify any misconceptions about the sweetener. My intended audiences for the essay were young adults, adults and elderly people. I have chosen my audiences from a wide range of people to spread the facts about high fructose corn syrup which we generally consume on a daily basis.

High fructose corn syrup is widely used in many marketed products. We regularly consume this sweetener knowing very little about its role on our health. I included the statistics that shows a 42% increase in fructose intake over the past 15 years. This signifies the customer trend won by corn syrup companies that allow them to manufacture more products. Another important factor that was included in my essay was the support of government in manufacturing corn syrup which indicates the real reason behind the widespread usage of this sweetener. Children are the most sensitive group who are affected easily by HFCS. They have 35% risk of developing diabetes at a young age. Adults who regularly consume this sweetener increase weight by gaining about 3 kg per two months. These health issues are unknown to many. I chose to include these statistics to highlight the real affect of HFCS on our health and to let others know about it.

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