Zaheer’s Topic Proposal

Since I having chosen to be an engineer major, I will be focusing on how the humanities have helped engineer majors through out City College. First I will discuss how the humanities have impacted and assisted me in my college career. I will then interview other engineer majors in the school to see their views on the humanities. City College students are exposed to the humanities through the liberal arts requirement. Finally I will interview one or two kids from Devry where the engineering students are not required to take any form of liberal arts and their studies are inundated with only math and science. Also if it is possible I would like to show how humanities has impacted the engineering field directly.

Zaheer Nooredeen
City College CUNY
Writing for the Humanities-Lynn Reid

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This entry was posted in CCR exchange: Stanford-CCNY, Fall 2010: Humanities, Identity, and Social Justice. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Zaheer’s Topic Proposal

  1. ccrvisitor says:

    Sounds interesting. Even though, people complain (including myself) about taking courses that don’t have anything to do with my major, there is good reason for being required to take these courses. It prompts a student to think and address various issues from a different focal point and be a well rounded individual. I’m an International Relations major and I really do not like having to take a natural sciences course or an engineering and applied physics. In what ways have the humanities helped you in your major?

    Josh Schott

  2. ccrvisitor says:

    I also plan to major in engineering. When I first registered for classes, I realized that I was only taking one directly relevant course for my major. I am required to take humanities for all of my freshman year. I know some engineering schools may not put as much emphasis on humanities and writing, but I’ve heard that the ability to communicate effectively is important in the engineering workforce. As engineers we will need to be able to make presentations and write persuasive emails. Now I’m not totally sure, but I think as engineering gain more experience and move up in the corporate ladder, they tend to do less engineering and more overseeing and communicating.
    I think this your topic is a great debate, would we rather have well-rounded engineers or really specialized ones?

    Kennan Murphy-Sierra

  3. ccrvisitor says:

    I think this is a very interesting and relevant topic. It is something that has invited a lot of debate and a paper that would analyze all these opinions and formulate its own argument seems like a very good idea.

    I am also thinking of taking up engineering. You can probably find more scholarly opinions on this but I hear that studying the humanities gives engineers a really good background on logical and critical thinking as well as writing. It is honestly so much more difficult for me to study the humanities, but I’m sure my school has its reasons for requiring me to. On that note, you can probably interview representatives of certain colleges for their take on the issue.

    Also, how you intend to gauge the effect of the humanities in the studies of engineering majors, considering that many factors affect their performance aside from the classes they take (like their inherent skill, the time and effort they put into studies, etc)?

    Geraldine Baniqued

  4. ccrvisitor says:

    I think this essay has a lot of potential. I also plan on majoring in engineering, but studying at least some humanities seems important to me. It is definitely interesting how different schools take different approaches with regards to teaching engineering. I also think it’s good that you want to talk about how humanities has affected the engineering field, as opposed to just college students. I know, for example, that Steve Jobs is noted for his concentration on aesthetics, which connects engineering and art. I’m sure there are many more examples as well. Good luck!

    Robin Jia

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