Researching Networked Culture

Starting this week, my students in my Networked Rhetoric sections will be posting about their research topics, showcasing one source or experience that has proven especially noteworthy as they now move to the middle of their research projects.  Since they have 5 more weeks to go on their projects, they would welcome feedback on their ideas and suggestions for additional sources or lines of inquiry.

Their tentative project titles currently are as follows:

As you can see, their interests vary from a concern with mediated politics, to how social media changes human relationships, to the construction and development of online communities, and real world applications of new technologies.  We look forward to explore this rich variety of topics over the next few weeks!

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21 Responses to Researching Networked Culture

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