Stanford-Sydney Connections

On October 11 through 14th, Stanford and Sydney students connected to discuss two commercials and to develop strategies for successful intercultural communication.

At the end of their hour long conversation, students worked together to think through the following questions:

  • What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two commercials?
  • What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with your group?
  • What was the most memorable/interesting/surprising moment from your conversation?
Below you’ll find some of their collaborative responses.
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105 Responses to Stanford-Sydney Connections

  1. emmeline says:

    Collaborative Reflection and Writing
    Ally Huchro, Jordan Speed, Denise Chen, James Mackinnon, Emmeline Cannan.
    We learned both commercials are innaccurate and misrepresent the countries. The commercials were not very
    persuasive. The commercials were highly stereotypical and exaggerated everything.
    The Australian commercial emphasized a simple / back to nature way of life. Everything moves at a slower
    pace in Australia. Therefore, the commercial does have some truth to it. It is a very iconic Australian
    landscape, but you have to go into the middle of Australia to find it.
    The California commercial emphasized an fun and carefree way of life. This lifestyle does exist,
    but, only for a couple days. The average Californian has a much calmer life.
    The most interesting part of the conversation was when we compared native slang and word usage.
    The most exciting part of the converstaion was when we compared our ideas of the other countries.
    We learned that talking to other people in other countries reveals that our lives are more
    similar than we would expect. Most of the differences we thought existed were just stereotypes, and as for
    talking, it is just like having a skype conversation with someone.

    • Skype Pilots 3 says:

      Call started
      [13/10/11 2:53:42 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: We learned that both commercials were not representative of the respective citizens of the countries.
      [13/10/11 2:54:51 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: The commercials are location-specific and narrow.
      [13/10/11 2:55:38 PM] Sydney Group B: most memorable moment was eating chocolate and cookies. We learnt that people at Stanford are friendly.
      [13/10/11 2:55:49 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: we like that
      [13/10/11 2:56:01 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: lol
      [13/10/11 2:56:30 PM] Sydney Group B: I learnt that advertising is a lie.
      [13/10/11 2:57:36 PM] Sydney Group B: lol
      [13/10/11 2:57:59 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: We learned that compulsory = mandatory (at least I did)…
      [13/10/11 2:58:10 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: I’ve never heard it in that context.
      [13/10/11 2:58:20 PM] Sydney Group B: interesting….
      [13/10/11 2:58:37 PM] Sydney Group B: sixteen pages! kjahsgdjlhabfl
      [13/10/11 2:59:10 PM] Sydney Group B: Cultural generalisations were rife in both ads
      [13/10/11 3:00:39 PM] Stanford CCR Group B: We spell generalizations with a z
      [13/10/11 3:01:04 PM] Sydney Group B: Tomatoes/tomatos

      • Skype Pilots 3 says:

        ^^^^ kristin, Anna, maddeline and Jess 😀
        Thanks Stanford!

      • Skype Pilots 3 says:

        We learned that both groups of students agreed that the commercials were not representative of the respective citizens of the countries. The commercials are location-specific and narrow. The commercial advertising California projected Californians as relaxed, laid-back, and constantly having fun. We saw logical fallacies in both commercials; fixing relationships should be much more complicated than just going to Australia, and not all Californians play golf, work at amusement park, and go to the beach.

        From video-conferencing, we learned that Australian students eat Cherry Ripe (coconut covered cherries). Joking aside, we learned that we can communicate on a similar level easily, and that Australians are very nice, not creepy people, further affirming that the Australian showed in the commercial is not representative of all Australians.

  2. Patrick Lee says:

    Australia and The United States (Blake Emmerson and Patrick Lee)

    The tourism commercials use rhetoric to appeal to pathos to enhance desirable stereotypes

    We thought the most memorable moment was that the boys thought…. Was that Stanford cheerleaders aren’t hot, contrary to popular media

    we learned that intercultural communication isn’t difficult with
    more similiar cultures. we share a common language, and due to
    globalization, we also share many of the same tv shows, sports, even
    similar slang! The only communication difficulty lies in the fact
    that we’re talking over video chat with inconsistent sound quality.

    We (Stanford students) found it interesting that two of them hadn’t
    been to the outback before, and that there’s no box jellyfish in
    the sydney area.

  3. It is interesting to see the two commericials appeared to target two completly opposite types of people with extremely different
    cultures. The Austrailian commercial relied on pathos in appealing to the emotions of Americans. The thought process it ignited was “sometimes I have
    bad days,too. Let’s go to Austrailia!” Whereas the American commercial used ethos, using the authority of familiar, popular faces to convince
    Austrailians to take a trip to California. The attitude presented in the California commercial was one of a laid back society, opposed to
    the workaholic attitude presented in the aforementioned commerical.

    After experiencing the intercultural communication, we have come to realize that though we may be a world apart, we are all very similar.
    Due to our youth, or maybe the globalization of our world, we found it very easy to communicate with each other as though we were
    neighbors.

    The most interesting part of our conversation with our new Austrailian friends was discovering that they are fourteen hours ahead of us.
    While we have just eaten dinner, they are heading to lunch… tomorrow. We are intrinsically the same, which provides hope for the future
    of tomorrow.

  4. nastasja, roxanne, steph, zena says:

    Neil, Kelsey, Nick

    Cross-Cultural Rhetoic Video Conference

    steph, roxanne, zena, nastasja

    What we learned from ads:
    As we are cross cutural in living in different countries, we are of similar age and interests and therefore
    we found that our reactions to the advertisements were similer in our rhetorical analysis.

    What we learned about interculutral communication:
    tha america has 50 states and have a wide variety of accents. our perception of america through the adverts
    and our interactions with neil, kelsey and nick didn’t chnage much to what we previously knew about america
    as the majority of television and movies watched in australia are american,
    Australia only has 7 states. There are fewer accents than the US. A small percentage of australia lives in
    central australia. Speaking together reestablishes the fact that we are all just people and can’t fit a national stereotype.

    the most memorbale moment:
    the prom photo

  5. We found that both advertisements play on the stereotypes of different regions and cultures. The Australian Ad played on pathos (indeginous boy), whereas the American Ad appealed\
    to ethos (Copious amounts of celebrity endorsment).

    The Australian ad relies more on the art of the film “Australia” than on the
    Australian culture.

    Both ads do not entirely represent the two cultures.

    Interesting/memorable parts:
    1) Both ads have logical fallacies
    2) The whiteboard works both ways!
    3) I don’t understand Vegemite

  6. bilgesu says:

    Advertisements use stereotypes to attract tourism.
    The ads use Pathos through storytelling.
    They use ethos to describe character of a country or state.
    Advertisements idealize culture.
    The most interesting parts of our conversation were when we talked about the irrelevant pieces of
    information. It was most interesting just to learn about a different culture.

  7. Cameron Baughn, Melissa Wibowo, Rachelle Han says:

    Advertisements use stereotypes to attract tourism.
    The ads use Pathos through storytelling.
    They use ethos to describe character of a country or state.
    Advertisements idealize culture.
    The most interesting parts of our conversation were when we talked about the irrelevant pieces of
    information. It was most interesting just to learn about a different culture and see that 18 year olds around the globe live similar lives. We had fun!

  8. USYD says:

    different appeals specific to certain cultures
    Australia – outside comfort zone / try new things
    commercials play to
    perception of what’s desired,
    but miss the mark

    commercials

    What we learned
    Australian football
    differences in
    Australian regions – urban
    vs. rural
    Accents
    we talked about popular sports in the US compared to Australia.ie football first, then baseball, whereas Australia is rugby,

  9. Tianda Deng says:

    Collaborative Reflection and Writing
    Team Members: Tianda Deng, Bernardo Espinosa, Reno Tsosie
    1) What did you learn about cross cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two commercials?
    We learned that different countries use their assets to the advantage by fostering “good” stereotypes. The California ad appeals to ethos by showing celebrities and how they enjoy the Californian culture. The Australian ad appeals to pathos by presenting the country as a get away from the busy city life.
    2) What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with your group?
    “It’s difficult because the internet isn’t awesome. We learned that Reno is just like people in the movies and people lie when they say they aren’t.”
    3) What was the most interesting/ memorable/ surprising moment from your conversation?
    Finding out that they were fascinated by American Culture. A lot of cultural norms we have in America is not available in Australia.

  10. Ben, Darren, Nino says:

    Ben, Darren, Nino with Josephine, Anastasia, Sam, and Jess

    Commercials tried playing to stereotypes / perceived desires, but missed the mark. Both cultures weren’t interested by ads. Instead of vacationing in a similar area, we wanted to try new experiences / break out of the “comfort zone” – i.e. Asia, South America. In particular, the Australian students would rather vacation in an area with snow (Colorado, etc.)

    Misperceptions:
    US is not all “fun / relaxing” – Australian ad only showed small segment of US society (businesspeople). As students, the ad didn’t appeal to us.
    Australia is not just the rural region (mostly urban, very few indigenous involved in Aus society)

    Interesting things we learned:
    Australian football (AFL) is perceived by Australians as their “stereotype sport”; cricket is not as popular
    US sports (football = 1, baseball = 2, NASCAR); soccer is not as popular, women’s soccer more popular than men’s soccer
    Australian accents very similar across country; US accents vary from region to region
    College sizes – 50,000 in Sydney vs. 15000 in Stanford (grad + undergrad)

  11. Brendan, Yang, Dilani says:

    We had different ideas about the stereotypes that suited our country the most. Also we realise we have been relying on assumptions about the knowledge that other cultures can bring, and it’s only through real communication that we realise what the true perceptions are. we also realised that the ads mainly focused on areas of differentiation between cultures and emphasized the good points. However in some cases this method is ineffective – particularly if it represents a world that is considered alien to them, or a concept that they have no reference for. An example is the use of the term “walkabout” in the ad promoting tourism in Australia.

  12. Both commercials play on the idea of ‘work vs. play’, suggesting that it is a theme common to the two countries. Whereas the American ad approached it with many cheesy puns about work and play, the Australian ad drew a stark contrast between the two. The Australian ad employs the idea that New York is a busy and rather gloomy place and contrasts it with the bright, relaxing natural scenes of Australia. The ad for California does not characterize it’s viewers, but rather just focuses on demonstrating the various recreational activities available in the state. The primary rhetorical appeal of the Australian ad is pathos as it shows the sad couple reconnecting and becoming happier. Pathetic appeal is common to the ads as the California ad shows many people enjoying themselves in various scenes. The California ad however makes its primary appeal to ethos as it shows numerous celebrities.

    We did not find intercultural communication to be particularly different. There were no apparent cultural barriers and no language barriers. Thus, communication was fluid aside from some technical bumps.

    We were surprised by our Australian peers’ interpretation of the Californian commercial. They thought that the commercial portrayed all Americans as rich.

  13. Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA says:

    Writing the same paragraphs at the same time seemed unreasonable, so we (Team America) wrote this:
    The main point to take away from this is that despite our different cultures, we both saw the commercials as inneffective. Although we did have different criticisms of each
    commercial, once the shortcomings were pointed out, we did both agree on the problems in the commercials. Both commericals attempt to play off the stereotypes of the “average”
    American or Australian, but at least from our perspectives, these stereotype-based arguments were not even remotely convincing.

    Communicating with different cultures is easy when there is no language barrier. Despite being seperated by vast physical distances and growing up in different cultures, we all
    seem to have similar thoughts and opinions regarding these advertisments. Living with 21st century technology has made the world a much smaller place, and the fact that all of us
    are in college helps us to relate to one another.

    The most surprising moment was our agreement over how the advertisements (especially the california one) failed. We didn’t have to argue our points because we all agreed on them,
    instead they only had to be stated and reinforced with an example or two. Also, the lack of stereotypical behavior was interesting; from our perspective, none of you fell into
    the typical Australian (although we aren’t sure who or what that is). Lastly, the fact that it’s only 4pm there…wow!
    And Team Australia (who rock) wrote this:
    We had different ideas about the stereotypes that suited our country the most. Also, we realise we have been relying on assumptions about the knowledge that other cultures
    can bring, and it’s only through real communication that we realise what the true perceptions are. We also realised that the ads mainly focused on areas of differentiation
    between cultures and emphasized the good points. However, in some cases this method is ineffective – particularly if it represents a world that is considered alien to them,
    or a concept that they have no reference for. An example is the use of the term “walkabout” in the ad promoting tourism in Australia.

    • Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA says:

      This was done by Greg Heon, Karsten Lutz, Brendan Phillips, Dilani Arulanandam, and Yang Yang

  14. Group D (Australia) says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two commercials?
    – Persuasive videos don’t reflect true nature
    – The Australian was very subjective
    – ethos and pathos identified from the Australian ad via the little boy
    What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with your group?
    – Difference in language (slang, expressions)
    – Stereotypes active American’s and celebrities
    What was the most memorable/interesting/surprising moment from your conversation?
    – Found out one the participants is friends with Arnold Schwartzaneger

    Bella, Jonathan and Tom

  15. Sophia Ginez, Daniel Tublin Denny Falls Ali Fauci James Constantine pava hofer Bronte O'Brien says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric form your analysis of the two commercials?
    – Definitely noticed some similarities between the two cultures… (California ad – surfboards, beaches, running with dogs etc.)
    – We (Australia) knew more about their (American) culture than they knew about our culture
    – Australian commercial was RUBBISH (in both our opinions) – too cinematic, didn’t capture the essence of Australia
    – Oprah vs Kerri-Anne Kennerly (billionaire vs. thousandaire)

    What was the most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from your conversation?
    -James knew a lot about American sports
    -Bronte liked Zombies and Bruce Springsteen
    – Lookalike vinny from jersey shore ROFLCOPTER
    – Americans are cool. NBA lockout is not cool.
    – Australians also say “bro” but we don’t say it like you do

    What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with your group?
    – We have different accents (captain obvious)
    – shelia = girl
    – G’day = NOT WHAT WE SAY. just want to clear that up.
    – No difficulties, pretty much on the same page

  16. N says:

    Group name: Stanford meets Usyd
    1.what did you learn about crosscultural rhetoric from your analysis of the 2
    commercials?
    S: australia has really nice nature, Grand canyon imitation, waterfalls….
    Overall, a good ad.

    2. What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with
    your group?
    Different accents..

    3. What was the most interesting/memorable/suprising moment from your
    conversation?
    Most surprising/interesting comment of this conversation was the stanford
    student’s response to aussies eating kangaroo meat. 😦 poor kangaroo

    Mariam, Nina and Dickson

  17. Sophia Ginez, Daniel Tublin, Denny Falls, Ali Fauci, Pava Hofer, Bronte O'Brien, James Constantine says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric form your analysis of the two commercials?
    – Definitely noticed some similarities between the two cultures… (California ad – surfboards, beaches, running with dogs etc.)
    – We (Australia) knew more about their (American) culture than they knew about our culture
    – Australian commercial was RUBBISH (in both our opinions) – too cinematic, didn’t capture the essence of Australia
    – Oprah vs Kerri-Anne Kennerly (billionaire vs. thousandaire)

    What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with your group?
    – We have different accents (captain obvious)
    – shelia = girl
    – G’day = NOT WHAT WE SAY. just want to clear that up.
    – No difficulties, pretty much on the same page

    What was the most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from your conversation?
    -James knew a lot about American sports
    -Bronte liked Zombies and Bruce Springsteen
    – Lookalike vinny from jersey shore ROFLCOPTER
    – Americans are cool. NBA lockout is not cool.
    -Australians also say “bro” but we don’t say it like you do
    -They don’t know what walkabout means

  18. LTK says:

    most memorable moment- discovering that we had both watched the double rainbow video on YouTube
    Frances Ball, Kelsey Suggs, Kenny Krotzer

  19. Patrick Lee says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two commercials?
    – Persuasive videos don’t reflect true nature
    – The Australian was very subjective
    – ethos and pathos identified from the Australian ad via the little boy
    What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with your group?
    – Difference in language (slang, expressions)
    – Stereotypes active American’s and celebrities
    What was the most memorable/interesting/surprising moment from your conversation?
    – Found out one the participants is friends with Arnold Schwartzaneger

    Bella, Jonathan and Tom

    Cross-cultural rhetoric:America (ad about America)
    -australian commerical portrays them as adventurous and
    care-free, American commercial portrays us as having
    stressful, hectic lifestyles
    – we don’t do work
    -only really advertise Southern California, doesn’t really
    reflect Amurikah as a whole
    -Typical Australian things aren’t actually that typical
    Laura Steven

  20. 1) Americans work mad hard get whispered to by aboriginals.
    2) Americans work hard to americans but don’t work to australian
    3) Cultural communication is similar, just that some cultures have
    superficial differences (SMS means texting))
    4) when we tried to impersonate each other’s accents

    Jordan Kutzer
    Sara Broski
    Cory Dodson
    Gerar Mazarakis

    Michael Levingston
    Danielle Altura
    James Gosper
    Gabriel Hand

  21. Patrick Lee says:

    Both the American and Australian
    commercial appeal to the differences
    between the ideal vacation for the two
    cultures.
    We believe some of the California stereotypes
    portrayed in the commercial are actually
    true. Though they did go overboard by
    showing celebrities in luxurious scenarios,
    the general laid-back attitude of Californians
    is very real. Similar to Australia, there is the
    opportunity to do fun outdoor activities and
    just enjoy yourself, but not necessarily
    everyone partakes in these.
    The most surprising thing we found out in
    our conversation was that Australians legally
    get four weeks each year for holiday.

  22. M says:

    1) Americans work mad hard get whispered to by aboriginals.
    2) Americans work hard to americans but don’t work to australian
    3) Cultural communication is similar, just that some cultures have
    superficial differences (SMS means texting))
    4) when we tried to impersonate each other’s accents

    Jordan, Sara, Cory and Gerar (Americans)
    Michael. Danielle. James, Gabriel (Australians)

  23. Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA says:

    U.S. used ethos: celebrities and recognisable people for all ages. Pathos: twisted the words around, presented as a utopia, fast cars, Disneyland, surfing etc. They seemed fun, inviting, playing on our desires.

    Australia used pathos: Emotional music, sweeping views of landscape lush green landscape.

    Neither used logos.

    Australians and Americans are more similar then they are different. Each grouped assumed we each wanted the same things. Both ads play on the same desires – a case of ‘the grass is always greener’. Even though it romantacised certain aspects, the opportunities you can find in Australia and what it’s known for (adventure, outback, connection with the land) were emphasized.

    We all love the same things, especially this subject 🙂

    Stanford: Alistair, Hamin Kim, Spenser, Kate
    Sydney: Grace, Sam, Bea, Granuaile, Veronica

  24. Isaac Halyard, Scott Roycroft, Rebecca Hammar, Asia Chiao says:

    Ethos an pathos were the primary rhetorical techniques used by both commercials. The australian one focuses on pathos- it taps into finding yourself, and incorporates kairos. The california advertisement utilizes celebrity figures by using ethos to appeal to foreign knowledge of California.

    The Australia advertisement portrays the city as gloomy and one colour, whereas the outback is seen as peaceful and a place to reconnect with
    yourself.

    COLOR!
    colour!!! mom mum aluminum aluminium
    VEGIMITE!!!

    VEGGIEMITE

    Kangaroos actually chase people in Australia! (If you provoke them). A lot of people take gap years in Australia,
    and then go to college somewhere near their hometown.
    WE MISS YOU! BYE!

  25. LTK says:

    Jessica, Alex, Anson, Kelly, Emma, Sean
    We learned it was important for the audience to feel like they are being addressed in order for rhetoric to be effective. We pronounce words differently, such as pathos, which can lead to difficulties. There are some words that each culture has that the other does not or we use different words to describe the same thing. For example, Americans call college “school” or “college” where as the Australians called it “uni” “university” or “college”. The most surprising thing was the quotes we said when we were trying to imitate each others accents. Jessica, Alex, and Anson were surprised that the Stanford students didn’t think they would talk like bogans.

  26. Group D (Australia) says:

    Group D 4pm
    Both ads also centered on Australian and American stereotypes.

    I think the ad put forward images that Australians what the world to see. We don’t all
    live in the wide open spaces and some of us have probably never been there.

    Becasue of the climate we are able to do lots of outdoor activities – this is probably
    similar to California. But this is not Australia or USA wide.

    We are surprised that in the U.S. you don’t have regular paid holdiays. We both get the
    same amount of university break. They were very stunned that we get 4 weeks of holiday, legally.

    So we all get Christmas holidays. Ugg boots are very popular in California. Some states
    and counties don’t sell alochol. In between states and regions vast differences. State
    rivalry in sports also between universities. Voting 18 but can’t drink until 21 which means a problem of underage drinking.

    Wendy, Dean, Gracie, Victor

  27. USYD says:

    Jessica, Alex, Anson from Sydney University talking to Kelly, Emma, Sean from Stanford University:
    About cross-cultural rhetoric:
    We learned that affective rhetoric needs to address the audience. We didn’t feel persuaded by the Californian commercial because we didn’t feel like it was addressed to us.
    Difference in the pronunciation of words – such as pathos. We both have slang that the other group couldn’t understand – bogan, schoolies. They also call university ‘school’.
    The most surprising/funny thing was Sean attempting to imitate a bogan Australian accent. Then Benjamin Miller and me imitated a Californian accent.
    It was really surprising for us that the Californian students didn’t expect us to talk like ‘bogans’.

  28. Michael, Shirley and Tim :D says:

    1. There is a lot of stereotyping; california assumes people want more activity; australians want to be identifiably “enlightened”
    2. We, as uni students, have very similar ‘interests’. Yes we do eat kangaroo.
    3. Cool interpretations of ads. woo ooh! (deep discussion of drink preference and height.)

  29. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    Bren.Brianna, Amy, Adrianna
    Appeals to similar audiences.
    Superficially, California and Australian cultures are similar.
    We learned that maybe our knowledge of American culture is limited.The same goes for Americans with Australian culture.
    We realized that most of the stuff we know about Australian culture is from pop culture.
    The most memorable moment for the Aussies was learning about the different university systems.
    The most surprising moment for the Americans was the time difference. Aussies are almost done with college! And also that they say “uni”

  30. Skype Pilots says:

    Skype Pilots – Amy and Adriana…
    Appeals to similar audiences.
    Superficially, California and Australian cultures are similar.
    We learned that maybe our knowledge of American culture is limited.The same goes for Americans with Australian culture.
    We realized that most of the stuff we know about Australian culture is from pop culture.
    The most memorable moment for the Aussies was learning about the different university systems.
    The most surprising moment for the Americans was the time difference. Aussies are almost done with college!

  31. California Video
    – Difficult to believe, focusing too much on the superficial aspects
    – Fallacies in the video made it hard to convince.
    – Excessive stereotyping: beaches, party lifestyle, movie star/Hollywood qualities,
    sports car on the road (misrepresentation),
    – Logos: The logical argument is that there are all these aspects and fun
    activities in California to explore, thus you should start planning for your trip
    here. However, the fallacy in here is that the didactic tone of the ad (telling
    you “what to do”), is actually unpersuasive.

    Australia
    – Uses dramatic effects to appeal to emotions. Touches on the theme that by
    immersing yourself in the natural beauty of Australia, one can discover oneself.
    – Much more effective than California ad.

    General comments:
    – Different cultural standards, the way different audiences view things is
    important to note. How effective the rhetorical text (in our case, the videos
    persuade, depends on the audience.
    – Pathos is the most effective rhetorical appeal for all audiences.
    – Logos is effective for many specific types of commercials, for example drug ads, but
    definitely not effective for tourism ads.

    The most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from our conversation:
    – We discovered that the ways we interpret the ads are totally different. ie. people in
    california would easily identify the misrepresentations and the fallacies in the cali ad.
    – Football is football. And soccer is soccer. Australian football actually has its roots in
    Aboriginal culture. (must google/youtube “afl”!! 🙂

  32. Emily Gittoes, Catarina Geallad, Jeremy Miranda, and Ashley Semanskee says:

    1.- The commercials are based on stereotypes that are not exactly correct and
    the stereotypes are from the country they are about. They also work on the preconceptions
    of the audience through the use of stereotypes to
    persuade them emotionally.

    2.- We learned that there were very little
    differences between two cultures internationally.
    There were very few problems communicating.

    3.- It was surprising to note that we are on two different scheduals (eg- starting and finishing uni at different times)

  33. Jordan Butler & Peter says:

    Both commercials exaggerate the stereotype associated with the location. They try to
    make both Australia and California even more driven by
    stereotypes. For instance, the California stereotype is progressed further in a way saying that the only lifestyle is that of a laid-back, easy-going one. Whereas, the Australian stereotype is progressed further by saying everything is outdoor living. In reality, these are both closer to the false end. There seems to be a lot of cultural similarities
    between English speaking countries. Even though there
    are differences in the slang, both sides seem to see
    through most of the stereotypes.
    It was really interesting to be reminded of the
    differences when speaking in terms such as “freshmen”
    and Celsius vs Fahrenheit.

  34. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    University of Sydney/Stanford CCR
    Group B
    Dalia, Alana, Joshua and Kate
    Lauren, Christina, Naren, Justin

    No logos in the advertisements
    Australian has pathos – appealing to stress and negativity
    American has pathos – appeal to need for excitement and enjoyment; plays on need for recreation
    American has ethos – uses celebrities to advocate CA; David Beckham, Arnold Schwarzenegger
    Australian has kairos – appeals to the time and place; the situation of being under stress or undergoing a breakup
    American has kairos – appeals to escapist attitude; getting away from everyday life for a world that is bigger and “better”
    American ad had rhetorical fallacies: stereotyping (most Americans do NOT live like that) 🙂
    Australian ad had rhetorical fallacies: Aborigine children do not break into your home and throw dirt on you. Exaggerated emotions from people undergoing extreme stress (unfair appeal to emotions)
    Fun is international. The view of fun and escape makes arguments that are persuasive across all cultures.

  35. -stereotypical – plays on australian stereotypes of indigenous culture (young child) and laid-back, fun aspects
    of californian culture … indicative, but by no means comprehensive
    -efficacy? california – yes; australia – kind of creepy, so… not really.
    -rhetorical appeals? australian ad used more kairos than the californian ad. both evinced extensive use of
    pathos, minimal use of logos. california ad used ethos through celebrity cameos.
    -appeal to universal desire to have fun/engage in recreation/escape mundane daily life

    Cross-cultural rhetoric
    -Appeals to more universal, baser desires to escape or have fun… culture-independent impulses
    -There are expansive ways to communicate cross-culturally such as electronically
    Most interesting/memorable/surprising moment
    -Comparing slang!

    Californian slang!
    hella, legit, dawgggg, (lax) bro/brah, dude, chill, swag, nbd (no big deal)
    Sydney slang 😛
    mate, stoked, ilchay, ‘pig-latin’, dunno, oath,

  36. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    The above post answers Question 1 of Part III

    2.) The communication is pretty easy because we speak the same language; while we may not be familiar with their slang, they understand ours because of all the American TV shows.

    3.) While they say “reckon,” we say “think.” Also, they don’t have Lucky Charms or sugary cereals. They emphasize healthy breakfast more.

  37. Isaac Halyard, Scott Roycroft, Rebecca Hammar, Asia Chiao says:

    They both appeal to emotion and pathos.

    The California ad appealed to ethos – celebrities
    The cross cultural rhetoric used in these two commercials inflate certain aspects about the locations in order to
    appeal to other cultures.

    We learned that our two cultures are actually very similar, except for our lingo.

    We have similar gestures, too.
    We found that each ad didn’t reflect the reality.

    The most memorable thing about our conversation was finding out how much we all had in similarities, and found the differences in their education
    and social life very interesting…

    Love,
    Group C

  38. Skype Pilots 2 says:

    Dalia, Alana, Joshua and Kate
    Lauren, Christina, Naren, Justin

    No logos in the advertisements
    Australian has pathos – appealing to stress and negativity
    American has pathos – appeal to need for excitement and enjoyment; plays on need for recreation
    American has ethos – uses celebrities to advocate CA; David Beckham, Arnold Schwarzenegger
    Australian has kairos – appeals to the time and place; the situation of being under stress or undergoing a breakup
    American has kairos – appeals to escapist attitude; getting away from everyday life for a world that is bigger and “better”
    American ad had rhetorical fallacies: stereotyping (most Americans do NOT live like that) 🙂
    Australian ad had rhetorical fallacies: Aborigine children do not break into your home and throw dirt on you. Exaggerated emotions from people undergoing extreme stress (unfair appeal to emotions)
    Fun is international. The view of fun and escape makes arguments that are persuasive across all cultures.

  39. Emily Gittoes, Catarina Geallad, Jeremy Miranda, and Ashley Semanskee says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the
    two commercials?
    Aimed at different audiences.
    The Australian students did not find the ad
    representative of their own culture, and did not portray the city well. The
    Australian ad shows a side of Australia that the general public doesn’t
    often experience. Most Australians live around the coast rather than in the
    areas in central Australia. The American students did not find the
    particularly enticing, since it appealed to a very small group of people who
    want to escape from a busy city lifestyle. Similarly, they found that the ad
    for America was a misrepresentation of the American lifestyle as whole. It
    reflected mainly what life would be like in Los Angeles.

    What did you learn about the intecultural communication from the discussion
    with your groups?
    There was a lot of curiosity about college social life on both ends. The
    communication was easier because we speak the same language. However, our
    cultures are very different and therefore it makes the discussion more
    interesting and broad.

    What was the most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from your
    conversation?
    The most memorable moment was the sharing of the cultural artifacts-when Alia
    showed the Australian students her mexican-style dress. The Australian and
    American students also enjoyed each others different accents.

    Australian Students: Chantelle, Yvette, Adria, Victoria, Justin
    American Students: Nika Soon-Shiong, Alia Yaghi, Alexandra Kim, Chase Basich

  40. Nika Soon-Shiong, Alia Yaghi, Alexandra Kim, Chase Basich, Chantelle, Yvette, Adria, Victoria, Justin says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the
    two commercials?
    Aimed at different audiences.
    The Australian students did not find the ad
    representative of their own culture, and did not portray the city well. The
    Australian ad shows a side of Australia that the general public doesn’t
    often experience. Most Australians live around the coast rather than in the
    areas in central Australia. The American students did not find the
    particularly enticing, since it appealed to a very small group of people who
    want to escape from a busy city lifestyle. Similarly, they found that the ad
    for America was a misrepresentation of the American lifestyle as whole. It
    reflected mainly what life would be like in Los Angeles.

    What did you learn about the intecultural communication from the discussion
    with your groups?
    There was a lot of curiosity about college social life on both ends. The
    communication was easier because we speak the same language. However, our
    cultures are very different and therefore it makes the discussion more
    interesting and broad.

    What was the most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from your
    conversation?
    The most memorable moment was the sharing of the cultural artifacts-when Alia
    showed the Australian students her mexican-style dress. The Australian and
    American students also enjoyed each others different accents.

  41. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    DRAFT YOUR REFLECTIONS WITH YOUR GROUP HERE 🙂
    American:
    The students believed the bias that that commercial presented in the sense that they thought we mostly spend time at the beach and surf. Also, they explained that Australia is not just a dynamic landscape where people “find themselves” and become immersed in the land. It’s actually rather similar to America in the sense that they live in an urban environment and we share the same past-time events such as partying or relaxing on the weekends. They say that it portrays them living in the desert, which clearly is false.Differences in school-work include deadlines. Deadlines are foreign to them. They have a very lenient schooling system.
    Australian:
    The American commercial portrayed what might be considered South California rather than California or America in general. The commercials were over saturated with celebrities, although the students reiterated the affluent lifestyle. Stanford is highly competitive, prestigious and selective. They are usually accepted into four-year programs, applying for graduate school afterwards. All first year students live on campus, with most continuing this trend over the duration of their studies. Study is rigorous and competitive and the students enjoy the intellectual environment. The students don’t currently engage in casual or part time employment. Students follow a strict assignment outline, in contrast to a more lenient system.

  42. Skype Pilots 3 says:

    Andrew, Akemi, Martin, Beth, and others

    The students believed the bias that that commercial presented in the sense that they thought we mostly spend time at the beach and surf. Also, they explained that Australia is not just a dynamic landscape where people “find themselves” and become immersed in the land. It’s actually rather similar to America in the sense that they live in an urban environment and we share the same past-time events such as partying or relaxing on the weekends. They say that it portrays them living in the desert, which clearly is false.Differences in school-work include deadlines. Deadlines are foreign to them. They have a very lenient schooling system.

    The American commercial portrayed what might be considered South California rather than California or America in general. The commercials were over saturated with celebrities, although the students reiterated the affluent lifestyle. Stanford is highly competitive, prestigious and selective. They are usually accepted into four-year programs, applying for graduate school afterwards. All first year students live on campus, with most continuing this trend over the duration of their studies. Study is rigorous and competitive and the students enjoy the intellectual environment. The students don’t currently engage in casual or part time employment. Students follow a strict assignment outline, in contrast to a more lenient system.

  43. Nika Soon-Shiong, Alia Yaghi, Alexandra Kim, Chase Basich, Chantelle, Yvette, Adria, Victoria, Justin says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two
    commercials?
    We learned that both nations used a narrow selection of the other culture in order to appeal
    to the tastes of the other culture. For example, the Australian ad appealed to Americans by
    having scenes of nature and native culture, even though that wasn’t necessarily representative
    of the entire culture. On the other hand, the American ad showed celebrities like Arnold
    Schwarzenegger.

    What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with the group?
    We learned that we weren’t as different as we thought we would be because we have a lot
    of common ground. It was relatively easy to communicate with each other even with cultural
    barriers.

    What was the most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from your
    conversation?
    The different words/slang that we both used, like “lolly” and “nappy” for “candy” and “diaper.” Also, we made some pretty sick drawings.

  44. Jacqueline Tao, Vincent Sparacio, Nafisa, Rich, River, Olivia says:

    STANFORD STUDENTS: THE THONGS

    -Australian commercial reflects the film style of director Baz Luhrman
    -Australian society is not as focused on showbusiness
    -“magic”
    -“Wow” factor, large film industry
    -Living out the dream
    -Perception of USA: very diverse; half very city like and the other half country like
    -Perception of Australia: A few heavily populated areas, but mostly “outback”

    Analysis:
    -Heavily based on stereotypes or preconceived notions that we had about each other
    -Australian video: mostly fun
    -American video: more celebrity oriented
    -Australia is more homogeneous
    -share many international celebrities
    -Different slang (Jumper = sweater; thong = flip flops)
    —————————————————————————————————————————
    Uni of Sydney: THE FLOPS

    American Commercial :
    – celebrity culture – appeals to us Australians as we base our
    views on America on their TV Shows ie. 90210, The OC
    – very showbiz based
    -California “all fun no business”
    -Will go to America because of the celebrities

    Perception of America :
    -stereotypes are true
    -All regions of America are diverse
    -High school clicks tend to DIE when they enter college
    -Different slang in different regions ie. Bubble Tea, Hella,
    Legit

    Australian Commercial :
    -feels very “Baz Luhrman”, his style

  45. they thought the Australia ad was sorta creepy too

    appealed to the movie though – same director/ themes/ font

    overly dramatic

    too harsh on America – all americans hate lives bc workaholics

    feel like Australia is more laid back in general

    gorges in North Territory, liked bc pretty and been there

    America Ad

    made them want to come!

    knew most of the celebs

    looked shallow, but played to expectations, and wanted to go

    like a movie

    Rhet. Analysis –

    uses preconceived ideas of opp. country to draw strong emotional response from aud. pathological appeal to opp.
    country

    ethos – Am. ad used celebs
    Aust. used an “American” to appeal to America

    they were amazing, and awesome, and lovely individuals, very informative

    Aust. is not that scary despite its ravenous beasts

    people arent that different

    slang – bogen – silly, simpleton, redneck
    McDonald’s – Mackers
    Canada = New Zealand/ Tazmania

  46. Nika Soon-Shiong, Alia Yaghi, Alexandra Kim, Chase Basich, Chantelle, Yvette, Adria, Victoria, Justin says:

    What did you learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two
    commercials?
    We learned that both nations used a narrow selection of the other culture in order to appeal
    to the tastes of the other culture. For example, the Australian ad appealed to Americans by
    having scenes of nature and native culture, even though that wasn’t necessarily representative
    of the entire culture. On the other hand, the American ad showed celebrities like Arnold
    Schwarzenegger.

    What did you learn about intercultural communication from the discussion with the group?
    We learned that we weren’t as different as we thought we would be because we have a lot
    of common ground. It was relatively easy to communicate with each other even with cultural
    barriers.

    What was the most interesting/memorable/surprising moment from your
    conversation?
    The different words/slang that we both used, like “lolly” and “nappy” for “candy” and “diaper.” Also, we made some pretty sick drawings.

    Australian names: Caitlin, Alex, Kiera, Beren
    American names: Shelley, Angel, Mary

    P.S. Australian toilets flush the other way.

  47. Michael, Shirley and Tim :D says:

    THE FLOPS

    American Commercial :
    – celebrity culture – appeals to us Australians as we base our
    views on America on their TV Shows ie. 90210, The OC
    – very showbiz based
    -California “all fun no business”
    -Will go to America because of the celebrities

    Perception of America :
    -stereotypes are true
    -All regions of America are diverse
    -High school clicks tend to DIE when they enter college
    -Different slang in different regions ie. Bubble Tea, Hella,
    Legit

    Australian Commercial :
    -feels very “Baz Luhrman”, his style

    Names : Nafisa, Rich, Quynh Tam, Olivia

  48. Danica, Rachel, Bethanie and Maysha says:

    We all decided that the commercials built on people’s preconceived ideas of Australia and America, building on stereotypes.
    Some interesting things we learnt were: College life, the ‘Greek’ system the importance of sport the term ‘hella cool’.
    Canada is ‘a stupid red headed dumb step child that plays hockey and is stupid’. -but they’re really nice too.

  49. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    American people:
    Andrew Barakat, Nicole Gilmore, Stephanie Carlisle
    Australian people:
    Felix, Caroline, Derick, Joel

    Australian ad
    The Australian ad looks a lot like a movie trailer.
    Tourist appeals – aimed at taking a break from work and stuff.
    Going away from the ambiguity of the USA and finding herself in Australia.
    Nostalgia – exaggeration of how things really are.
    Australians and Australia
    The aboriginal child is not really representative of Australia either. There is a play on the ignorance of Americans and a lack of knowledge about the indigenous people and culture.
    Pathos driven.

    American ad
    David Beckham: why was he there? he shows an example of a “foreigner” coming over
    Another ad targeted the active aspect of the healthy, attractive, Australian people.
    Not representative of daily life.
    Ethos driven.

    Together
    What did we learn about cross-cultural rhetoric from your analysis of the two commercials?
    They based it on people’s pre-conceptions.
    Difficult for people to draft what each tourist group is looking for.
    Australia=California capitalism, developed, pretty laid back
    The commercials also played up on the ignorance of both groups of people.

  50. Nika Soon-Shiong, Alia Yaghi, Alexandra Kim, Chase Basich, Chantelle, Yvette, Adria, Victoria, Justin says:

    australian culture misrepresented, not many aboriginals, no walkabou, dont
    live in the country.
    real city life, no stress

    california life misrepresented: superficial, tourist attractions, not that
    laid back, don’t see celebrities everywhere, pretty normal people.

    Australian life: not enough aboriginals to have tribes walking around.

    australian commercial: appeals heavily to pathos and the insight we would receive from visiting the
    country, portrays fantasy land instead of the reality of the culture

    american advertisment: very heavily based upon consumer culture aided by ethos.

    The most interesting moment from the conversation is that you know a lot more about our culture
    than we do of yours.

    most interesting; we know too much about your culture.

    stanford students: Adebia, Thai, Katherine

    USYD studetnts; Xan, Imogen, Jessie, vinayak.

  51. After watching both commercials on life in Sydney and
    California, we coincide that academic rhetoric has
    been utilised in each commercial to convince the
    audience of a certain image regarding each country.
    The Australian commercial encompassed ‘pathos’ by
    appealing to a romantisised and quite picture, whilst
    the Californian commercial used ‘ethos’ by appealing
    to celebrity authority. Although both techniques were
    adopted in the commercials, the effectiveness of
    there rhetoric was not equally pursuasive.

    The commercial about California used academic
    rhetoric effectively and persuaded people from other countries
    to come visit by focusing on depicting California as fun and
    adventurous. The Australian commercial appealed to an
    older audience, rather than its target audience;
    teenagers.

    Julia, Jess, Lin, Chelsea
    Natasha and Ali

  52. Courtney Montgomery, Caroline Hernandez, Steve Kim says:

    Pathos: Escape your busy lifestyle and leave the concrete jungle behind
    The commercials define Australia in a very stereotypical traditional fashion.
    The Australian commercial leaves out a lot of the Australian culture: Beach, BBQ, Thongs, beer, city life, multiculturalism.
    Lack of logos in both
    Ethos in California commercial by having celebrities (?)
    Audience: the commercials are directed at busy working people
    The commercials define Californians as goofy and fun-loving (not hard workers). This is not
    representative of a lot of Californians.
    Although it was a stereotype, the scenery in the Australian ad was beautiful and enticing.

  53. Adebia Ntoso, Thai Nguyen, Katherine Nasol, Xan, Imogen, Jessie, Vinayak says:

    australian culture misrepresented, not many aboriginals, no walkabou, dont
    live in the country.
    real city life, no stress

    california life misrepresented: superficial, tourist attractions, not that
    laid back, don’t see celebrities everywhere, pretty normal people.

    Australian life: not enough aboriginals to have tribes walking around.

    australian commercial: appeals heavily to pathos and the insight we would receive from visiting the
    country, portrays fantasy land instead of the reality of the culture

    american advertisment: very heavily based upon consumer culture aided by ethos.

    The most interesting moment from the conversation is that you know a lot more about our culture
    than we do of yours.

    most interesting; we know too much about your culture.

    stanford students: Adebia, Thai, Katherine

    USYD studetnts; Xan, Imogen, Jessie, Vinayak.

  54. Casey, Bailey, and Jackie says:

    We found the commercials to be very narrow and not an accurate representation of the country as a whole.
    There are many similarities, but some differences are schooling, like how Stanford students live on campus and Australian students do not.
    The entire experience itself was memorable – it was really amazing to meet students from an entirely new culture!
    ~ Bailey, Casey, and Jackie

    • Eleonora (Elle) Kazantzis, Rebecca, Linh, Joel says:

      – It was interesting to see how the California Ad advertised Southern CA more than any other areas, as the Australian Ad showed more of the Northern Territory/Western Australia landmarks. We also found that the california ad was more realistic as to what you may encounter, whereas the Australian one was not. It would be very rare for you to be swimming in a lake in the Australian outback.
      – Most memorable experience for us was discussing the uni life and happenings, we discovered we all have a Quidditch team. One of us Having Met Youtube queen, Natalie Tran from the Community Channel! 😛 And Caseys flashing Bike light! Was great to meet students from completely different countries and realise that.. overall… we are the same.

  55. Alessia, Kara, Nithya says:

    They focus on the stereotypes to appeal to the
    consumers.
    crosscultural rhetoric never portrays a
    country, and always appeals to consumerism and
    money
    They love Quentin Tarantino!

  56. We learned that no one appreciated the commercials appeal because the way they tried to
    advertise the cultures were clearly false. They tried to use emotional appeals to make a
    point that didn’t come across well, and they used a fallacious use of logos

  57. Tas (Anastasios), Nick, Jing, Jwon. Awa, Paige, Lucia. says:

    The two commercials had different approaches to reach their audiences.
    American commercial had many celebrity endorsements and used a joking, sarcastic
    method.
    Austrailian commercial was very serious.
    Same as what Austrailians would have expected from an American commercial.
    They both conflict as the Australian ad shows Americans to be serious and the American
    ad shows Americans to be fun.
    No cross ccultural difficulties encountered.
    It was interesting how Australians don’t live on campus where as Amaericans do. The
    different slang used was interesting.

  58. Adam , Dafna , Oliver, Sunny, Misha, Beth says:

    its appeals to the logic of ethos. meaning that it draws attention to the idea of finding
    yousrelf in Autraaalia, compared to just appealing ot australia itself.
    creating and idea withing a subject
    …that sounds pretty good
    yay

    Australia is unique because you can
    pass between different climate zones
    easily

    Most Australians haven’t seen all
    of Australia; the same applies to
    Americans living in California

    The commercials are exaggerations; clearly misconceptions are common in the advertisements. But to
    logically distinguish between reality

  59. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    The two commercials were created with mixed messages. The “walkabout” commercial, for example, was meant to encourage foreigners to visit Australia, but is also doubly meant to incite all viewers (foreign and Australian) to visit themselves and ‘find’ their inner identity.

    For the US people, we noticed the blatant rhetorical fallacies of the California scenes. The Australian students were quick to recognize the exaggerations, but still were not completely convinced that the US portrayal of its citizens was completely fallacious. The Stanford students explained that the commercial was grossly exaggerated; we do not see celebrities daily in public venues (they asked).

    As we got to know each other during the introductions, we shared bits of slang with one another. “Frogurt” for “fro-yo”, “bin” for “trashcan”, “nose goes” approximates for “shotty not”.

    • Bryton Law says:

      Hello!!!
      It’s Bryton from the link-up (the 1/6th Scottish hahaha)
      Sorry but I might have remembered the names wrong;
      Emma, Karen and Shareen?
      The group with the half filipino from Hawaii, one from the east coast and one from california;

      My group forgot to add you guys on Facebook to keep in touch!!

      Looking forward to your reply!

  60. 1. Builds on pre-conceived ideas of countries and stereotypes &
    Rhetoric depends on who the audience is and their culture
    2. It was very easy to communicate interculturally. We all noticed slight accents, but it
    wasn’t too hard to understand each other. It was fun to speak with people from all the
    way across the world.
    3. That we are more similar than we think despite living on other sides of
    the world.

  61. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    We learned that both groups of students agreed that the commercials are not representative of the respective citizens of the countries. The commercials are location-specific and narrow. For example, the Californian ad focused mostly in Southern California, whereas their ad focused mainly on the Northern Territory in Australia. The commercial advertising California projected Californians as relaxed, laid-back, and constantly having fun. We saw logical fallacies in both commercials; fixing relationships should be much more complicated than just going to Australia, and not all Californians play golf, work at amusement parks, and go to the beach.

    From video-conferencing, we learned that Australian students eat Cherry Ripe (coconut covered cherries). Joking aside, we learned that we can communicate on a similar level easily, and that Australians are very nice, not creepy people, further affirming that the Australian showed in the commercial is not representative of all Australians.

    • Bryton Law says:

      Hello, was this the group with (sorry but I might have remembered the names wrong)
      Emma, Karen and Shareen?
      The group with the (half filipino) ; cross-cultural 😛

      My group forgot to add you guys on Facebook to keep in touch!!

  62. Daniel Cope says:

    dont forget Jamie, Amy, Sarah-Jane

  63. Santiago Seira, Max Kohrman, Natasha Weiss says:

    The Aussies believe that the California tourism ad portrayed Americans as materialistic,
    but they know better than that. They also had preconceived notions about American college
    students based upon what they had seen in poor quality American movies such as “American
    Pie” that portray college students as sex-crazed, perpetually drunken party-goers.We
    noted that we used different vernaculars, for instance they use the words “mate” and
    “uni”, while we say “dude” and “school”. As for university life, the students typically do not live
    on campus. They live at home and most spend time out of school at jobs.
    As for the Australia tourism ad, the students said that it doesn’t show everyday life,
    similar to how we felt about the California tourism ad. :{o

  64. Lucas, Albert, Lana, Eloise, Will, Tayla, Omar says:

    Through careful discussion of the two tourism ads, we
    methodically analyzed the rhetorical instruments
    presented to us.
    Lesson learned:
    1.Stereotypes are heavily used in each ad.
    2.Pathos was the dominant rhetorical strategy
    3.CA ad did not have intended effect on the Australians.
    It seemed more stressful than living in Australia.
    4. Australia ad seemed nice. Very relaxing.

    II. Communication is possible. Not any weirder than a
    random video chat online. Would be much easier in person.

    Australian side more curious; passionate about clubs. Often it is hard to know what
    questions to ask simply because we don’t always know what
    differences in our cultures exist. But we still connected
    about sports, social activities, and music. Random
    conversation sometimes leads to some of the best
    discoveries.

    Most memorable moment: we both got cookies. random or
    planned?

    !!??;;().:);):D

  65. Skype Pilots 3 says:

    -Californian ad appeals to logos and facts rather than Australian advertising which utilised pathos
    -Intercultural cultural communication does not differ greatly, however minimal cultural differences are apparent
    -Thought provoking differences such as drinking age and legal driving ages

  66. Kate, Benvinda, Lilly, Spencer, Fang, and Dalton says:

    The Californian ad appeals more to their culture and the Austrlian ad appeals more to us
    Australians. The Australian ad was just designed to suit the Australian culture while the
    Californian ad was designed to suit theirs. Pathos was used in both ads, the Australian
    one more in particularly. Kairos was employed in the advertisement from the
    Australian Tourism Board. The ad was produced shortly after the popular movie
    Australia. The ad was most likely made to mirror the movie. People of different
    cultural backgrounds respond differently and interprets the intended appeal of the
    ad differently. The rhetorical fallacy in the Australian ad – you wouldn’t actually live in the middle
    of the dessert or the canyon. Sydney and Melbourne are more cosmopolitan cities. author
    may deliberately use fallacy to appeal to people who are looking to escape. The fallacies in the California ad were that Californians relaxed all day long and that there were celebrities everywhere. Cross cultural rhetoric- differ, in some cases intercultural communication is difficult
    and non effective. ( in regards to adverts).

    memorable moment – awfully attempted australian and californian accents

  67. We thought that neither commercial was an accurate representation of the other
    culture because they were too generalized. Both advertisements also made assumptions
    about the other culture. The Australian advertisement was aimed at an older
    generation whereas the Californian advertisement was targeted at a younger aged
    audience. While the Australian commercial encouraged the viewers to find themselves,
    the American commercial encouraged them to lose themselves. Ethos was used
    throughout the Californian commercial while pathos was used in the Australian
    commercial.

    While we’re from so many different cultures and backgrounds, we found that we had
    similar interests and preferences. We found that pop culture was a really good way
    to relate. We both enjoyed the same kinds of music, movies, and food, for example.
    Some of the most interesting moments in our discussion were the comments on both
    cultures, as well as breaking stereotypes about each other’s cultures.

  68. Lucas, Albert, Lana, Eloise, Will, Tayla, Omar says:

    The Flippy Floppies

    Portrayal of Australians:
    – Laidback
    – In touch with themselves
    – Rural aspects (over?)!!!
    represented

    Rhetorical techniques:
    – Using names to represent
    a change in identity: Formal
    (work) title vs. First name
    – Aboriginal child: tradition,
    celebrating heritage.

    Stereotypes:
    – In reality the relationship
    between the aboriginal and the
    australian community is not
    that harmonious.

    Portayal of Americans:
    -(Over)emphasis of celebrity culture
    – in both cases major aspects of the commerical were idealized.

    Logos: California ad – advertising facts about activities available;
    although certain aspects are over-represented.
    Likewise for the Australian ad. There do exist areas of natural beauty
    and aboriginal culture is usually part of a tourist experience.

    Pathos: The desire to change one’s self, or be in touch with one’s
    self. Appeal to relaxation: an atmosphere of fun.

    Most surprising or interesting things about the conversation: Learning
    about each other – the structure of our university lives (for example
    the fact that many people live off campus) the linguistic details we
    share (think thongs).

    Aussie’s most surprising moment: that you all live on campus and
    definitely the thong/flip-flop thing (cultural slang difference

    Edward, Vec, Sophie, Makeda, Brian, Manni

  69. Eileen Trieu, Allison Semrad Group C, Taejoon, Chanel, Jennifer says:

    Both appeal to stereotypes of their respective places. California being celebrity-ridden
    and Australia being sceanic, calming getaway.
    California looks just like it does on television to us.
    The Australian commercial looks like the place that we would go on holidays.

    We noticed subtle differences in usage of words. For example, holiday vs. vacation and
    college vs. uni.
    There were differences in the way we work. American universities are more social due to living close together.
    It was interesting to realize that the stereotypes do have a real effect. The commercials
    reenforced the vacation image of their respective places. VEGEMITE!
    It was interesting that the stereotype of having kangaroos was still strong.

  70. Gloria Jeong, Veronika Valova, catherine, Lucas Rowley, Anika Naidu says:

    It was easy to see the similarities between the culture of the two nations and how they are both looking for that relaxing escape. The commercials really focused on this aspect, but in different ways based on the stereotypes of the two countries. For example the American way is that of a party “have and good time” nature.

  71. Group D (Australia) says:

    Group D (Seth, Dennis, Geo, Shae, Samson, and Chloe)

    Cross cultural rhetoric -commercial analysis:
    – both commercials appeal to the tourists interests.
    Stereotypes are portrayed to exaggerate the sense of
    cultural identity.
    -Both commercials use
    pathos to portray a
    more relaxed life style
    than we are accustomed
    to at home
    – We use different vocabulary for same items, e.g. sweater
    and jumper
    – Different university styles, economic considerations,
    etc

  72. Both we and the group from Australia did not think that either
    commercial was indicative of the other. Through conversation we were
    able to correct each others misconceptions. While we appreciated the
    discussion that evolved from the commercial we felt that we learned more
    through honest dialogue. Some of the new things that we learned included
    Australia’s savory equivalent of the PB&J sandwich, Vegamite. We also
    learned about Australian Pop Stars, including Angus and Julia Stone.

  73. Stanford-Sydney convo Room E says:

    Raena Sumiyoshi
    Nora Nguyen
    Steven Shepard
    Ting Shu
    James Elphick
    Leela Landers

    -Both advertisements rely heavily on pathos
    -the Australian ad appeals to the middle-class,
    business people who want to escape from their busy
    lives (because lots of Americans these days seem to
    focus too much on work, often working overtime)
    -the American ad portrays a lot of celebrities and
    focuses only on popular California tourist
    locations that don’t accurately represent America
    as a whole country
    -both commercials definitely use exaggeration to
    make the respective country more appealing (ie, the
    water is crystal clear and bright blue)

    -just as a note about cultural differences, we
    noticed that Australians use a lot of abbreviations
    in their daily conversation
    -the most interesting thing we learnt was that
    Stanford has a good football team and were more
    similiar than we thought and you guys are nice

  74. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    We discussed how commercials define Australia and California through the use of persuasive rhetorical devices, such as logos, ethos, pathos, and kairos. We discussed subject medium: the California ad was more focused on the “fun” factor, whereas the Australian ad portrayed a more broad concept of Australian identity (nature, outback, self-discovery). But both ad utilised celebrities.

    We all come from different places and both Universities have particularly diverse student bodies. Also, it was exceptionally easy to communicate. There was awesome picture quality.

    Americans are not surprising. Nor are Australians. Except for their odd love of Vegemite. I find it interesting that wearing clothes with university logos or symbols on are common – in Australia it’s not a common sight, as everyone wears casual clothes.

    Suzie Greneche, Jessica Yeoh, Victoria Yu
    Alex Alifimoff, Jordan Shapiro, Simon Kim,

  75. Forrest Browning says:

    Stanford: Forrest, Lingtong and Haley

    Sydney: Freya, Jessica, Alex

    1). Through our discussions about the advertisements, we discovered that although we come from different backgrounds, we still interpreted the ads in basically the same way. Sydney and Stanford are not as different as one might assume, and not much was “lost in translation” due to cultural differences.

    2). With the modern technological advances, there is a lot more cross-cultural communication at all levels; therefore, the global networking system has opened up avenues for cross cultural communications. This allows us to break down stereotypes.

    3) (Biscuits) Cookies -sharing the obesity crisis; we (Stanford) were surprised that the group from Sydney didn’t live on campus.

  76. Both of the commercials demonstrate different methods of appealing to their audience and depictions of the country. In the Australian commercial, the only cultural symbol was the kid. They used the child as a pathos appeal as a symbol of hope, freedom, and happiness.The two commercials used different appeals to attract the audience. In the Australian one, the child is used to appeal pathos.The American one show a lot of stereotypes and used a lot of celebrities (ethos). Logos, pathos, and kairos were also present. We felt that at times there was a language barrier present in our conversation. The Stanford students were surprised to learn that kangaroos don’t run around Australia. The Sydney students were surprised that not everyone in California surfed and that not all stereotypes are true.

    Ricky: rmhoft@stanford.edu
    Chelsea: charris9@stanford.edu
    Hector: hec2011@stanford.edu
    Matthew: mpick@stanford.edu

  77. Goanna Man (Group D) says:

    Q1.
    The commercials juxtaposed the two cultures to point out differences between them and persuade viewers to desire the other culture. They appealed to culture stereotypes to make
    them relatable to the viewer and emphasize the benefits of each culture.

    Q2.
    The stereotypes represented in the commercials are not necessarily correct in their assumptions
    about the different cultures. Specifically in the Australian commercial they depict
    activities that most Australian’s would not participate in.

    Q3.
    Goannas!!! What?! Six foot long lizards?!?!
    That the Hollywood sign is in California.
    You can get a kangaroo hunting license.

  78. Stanford: Michael, Shirley and Tim :D Sydney Uni: Anna, Chauntelle, Alistair, Marshall says:

    The Aussies believe that the California tourism ad portrayed Americans as materialistic,
    but they know better than that. They also had preconceived notions about American college
    students based upon what they had seen in poor quality American movies such as “American
    Pie” that portray college students as sex-crazed, perpetually drunken party-goers.We
    noted that we used different vernaculars, for instance they use the words “mate” and
    “uni”,while we say dude and school. As for university life, the students typically do not live
    on campus. They live at home and most spend time out of school at jobs.
    As for the australia tourism ad, the students said that it doesn’t show everyday life,
    similar to how we felt about the California tourism ad. :[D

    From the interaction with the students from Stanford we learned that the ad for California was a false portrayal of the Californian lifestyle. What we saw in the ad and what they said to us were two different things. They saw the Australian commercial as “dark” and “magical” through the use of the Aboriginal and the dust. We were able to hear about what they think the Aussie lifestyle is “put a shrimp on the barbie”. Differences in the Australian and American college/uni life
    was that they all live at college in dorms and college whereas we all live at home and travel via public transport. Every student at their college rides bikes everywhere, so when lectures end there are bikes everywhere! They were really intriuged by “tim tams” and they said they would research it. They were really friendly.

  79. Stanford-Sydney Room E says:

    Music – Lady Gaga is very popular, Taylor Swift,
    Katy Perry

    Slang – uni, how ya goin’,devo, fluoro, mate,
    spewin’ (poor thing), doin your head in, bloody

    Stereotypes – Americans are very laid back and
    happy

    Sports – rugby is the biggest, soccer also
    popular, American football called “gridiron”

  80. US says:

    In cross cultural rhetoric it is vital to reach your audience in a manner which appeals to them.
    Western is western. Despite our differences we share a common bond with one another; a pursuit of knowledge and a desire to learn more about each other. That in and of itself allows for cross cultural exchange. We were all stunned to learn that life isn’t what it looks like on TV; however, despite many dreams being crushed in the process, we learned that we are not that different. We all like music, sports, bashing other sports, bashing on the bashing of other sports, and even share some TV shows!

    -Vignesh
    -Janelle
    -Michelle
    -india
    -chris
    dianna
    anastasia

  81. Jessica, Will, Tara and Maddie says:

    Our Names:
    Stephanie
    Kyle
    Oscar

    Jessica
    Will
    Tara
    Maddie

    Our Reflection:

    From our analysis of the two commercials we learned that Americans present their country as a place where you can come and meet other people while doing fun, social activities; while Australians present their country as being a place where you can find yourself by spending alone time. We also concluded that the Australian commercial presented a view that not many people would typically think of when they think of Australia. The California commercial seemed to reinforce established ideas of the area, enlisting celebrities to attract viewers. Overall, it seems as though these advertisements attempt to package simplified ideals of their countries. We learned that intercultural communication is hella fun and it’s fun to learn different lingo. Most interesting was talking about drinking and partying. YAY! 🙂

  82. Group D: Ellen, Arushi, Laura says:

    The advertisement directed at Australian society lacks appeal to emotion (pathos) in its limited focus on the fast paced life of Californians. It falsely glamourises the lifestyle that Califorians have, and focuses heavily on the ethos of the celebrities. The Australian commerical uses pathos as its primary means to convince the audience of the appeal of Australia, as the contrast of the industrialized ‘American’ city and the ‘mystical’ Aboriginal child gives the impression that Australia provides a spiritual escape and experience to its tourists.

    The two commercials did not address many of the aspects of each country. For example, the Californian advertisement only represented Los Angeles and did not
    portray the Central Valley or other lifestyles. The Australia advertisement focused on the natural wilderness areas and the desert instead of the other industrialized areas. The California ad
    uses a lot of ethos by using celebrities to endorse the state, while pathos was
    predominant in the Australia ad. The California ad did not appeal to the Australians because they would have rather seen someone they could relate to in the ad.

    We have different slang. Ghetto kids is the equivalent of lads and gangas. Hella is not a common word in Australia. American “flip-flops” are equivalent to Australian “thongs.”

    An interesting moment in our conversation is when we were comparing accents. People in Queensland talk with their mouths closed because there are a lot of flies.

    • Group D: Ellen, Arushi, Laura says:

      cross-cultural rhetoric
      -rhetoric exists and is shaped and
      formed by the cultural experience
      and values held by the individual
      – the same rhetoric may be viewed
      differently based on one’s
      background. We each viewed each
      other’s commercials differently,
      thinking the other commercial
      seemed somewhat silly based on
      their attempts to attract
      tourists, i.e. use of indigenous
      and celebrity endorsements (no one
      in australia surfs with makeup
      on).

    • Ellen says:

      Ashley, Krenz, and Cheeseth were also in this group

  83. Stanford-Sydney Room E says:

    Australia:
    – Don’t live in dorms; mostly commute
    – Uni slang
    – football (soccer), rugby, cricket popular
    sports
    – thought the ad was aweful, ridiculously
    stereotypical
    – Only one place that snows

    US:
    – Texans say yall

    Commonalities:
    – Senior apparel
    – School traditions?
    – Lots of international
    students

    Ads: Both stereotypical
    Don’t accurately reflect culture
    Only showcase one part of the nation/state

    -Julia, Katherine, Natalya; Tom, Sam, Kenjo

  84. Gloria Jeong, Veronika Valova, catherine, Lucas Rowley, Anika Naidu says:

    Jess Mckeezie, Sunjae Weon, Gabriella Wong
    Charles Cox
    Sunil Rao
    Keaton Nager

    The Appeal of pathos in the Australian Ads as opposed to ethos within the American Ads

    Australia uses an appeal to pathos, emphasizing their natural beauty to advertise, and the United States uses more ethos in the inclusion of celebrity cameos. Both build off of the known cross cultural stereotypes of their specific country.

    Our cultural similarities helped make getting to know each other easier. We had common talking points from the beginning. American and Australian cultures overlap a lot. We spent most of the time talking about things we have in common.

    The cultural similarities and differences ensure that the conversation flowed. Such as differences in drinking age, accents etc. Although sharing experiences and shared common values across the conversation.

    The most memorable moment was the comparison of accents across teh American culture as opposed to the Australian Culture.

  85. Stanford-Sydney Room E says:

    Each country tries to portray the
    stereotypical views of themselves.
    Although that view may not be completely
    true and represent the whole population,
    advertising distorts the cultural
    identity in order to attract tourist. Our
    cultures are a lot more similar than
    expected. While there are many
    differences like the emphasis of sports
    and education system, we share a lot of
    interests. The most interesting moment of
    our conversation was the differences in
    sports between our two countries and our
    discussion about drinking regulations.

  86. Group D (Australia) says:

    Australian: Jemima, Marti, Cannie
    Stanford: Louis & Ben

    II. Australian Pathos
    – Life-changing experiences
    -appealing to wanting to
    escape rain, stress etc
    Cali Pathos
    – Stress free, enjoying life,
    entertainment
    Sports, celebrity
    endorsements

    III. cross-cultural rhetoric
    -rhetoric exists and is shaped and
    formed by the cultural experience
    and values held by the individual
    – the same rhetoric may be viewed
    differently based on one’s
    background. We each viewed each
    other’s commercials differently,
    thinking the other commercial
    seemed somewhat silly based on
    their attempts to attract
    tourists, i.e. use of indigenous
    and celebrity endorsements (no one
    in australia surfs with makeup
    on).

    The most in†eresting
    moment was:
    – the social life in
    uni
    -learning about how
    different cultures
    have different ways of
    interpreting the
    commercials
    -sharing the different
    interpretations of
    rhetoric

  87. Jessica, Will, Tara and Maddie says:

    Met four cool mateys from Australia: Henry, Gina,
    and two girls who were late, Georgie and Katie.

    – sorry we were stuck in traffic

    We learnt that California looks like a great place.
    We learned that stereotypical perceptions are often times false and misleading. Both commercials were both similar in their appeals to pathos. The Californian advertisement had an appeal to ethos (many celebrities, etc.). Both regions were portrayed as a sort of escape.

    The main cultural differences between the Australian and American commercials were that the California commercial seemed to appeal to the celebrity aspect – when one thinks of america that is generally they outstanding culture. Where as the australian commercial appeals to the beauty of the landscape and the culture present in Australia. → suggesting that perhaps there is a more superficial culture in america?

  88. Group D: Ellen, Arushi, Laura says:

    Hello. Can you read this?

    Hey
    It seemed to both groups that neither of the
    commercials were very effective and failed to
    properly portray the culture.
    Colour should be spelt with the ‘u’! (incorrect)

    The intercultural communication was easy. We had no difficulties communicating with each other.
    The Stanford students were quite surprised to
    learn that Kieran and Australians eat Kangaroo steak on a
    regular basis and the Sydney students were
    surprised to learn how small Stanford is in
    comparison of student body size.

  89. Stanford-Sydney Room E says:

    In analyzing the ads we noticed that the writers were
    appealing to stereotypes of each culture. The use
    of these stereotypes allowed these ads to appeal to a
    larger audience. Through this exercise, we realized that
    even within cultures there is diversity. It was
    interesting to realize that those from other cultures
    have different perspectives on our homelands. On of the most
    memorable moments from the conversation was the sharing
    of our cultural artifacts.

  90. We learned that California looks like a great place.

  91. Gloria Jeong, Veronika Valova, catherine, Lucas Rowley, Anika Naidu says:

    1. The commercials idealize American and Australian culture without representing the d
    ay-to-day lifestyles. The commercials are aimed at the most appealing aspects of culture.
    2. There are a lot of similarities between American and Australian culture such as interest in movies, music, clothes, activities and social networking, but ultimately differ with respect to politics, campus life, and subcultures such as drinking and smoking.
    3. It was interesting to see commonalities between cultures as well as differences, namely in “abbrevs” that are developed by each culture. There are similarities in the multicultural nature of city life and the prevalence of stereotypes in the country.

  92. Sydney-Stanford Group B says:

    Natalie Gonzalez
    Reed Johnson
    Matt Hattori
    Rex Garland

    California ad
    Pathos – beach scene appealed to carefree lifestyle
    Ethos – portrayed happy go lucky people
    scratch that
    Ethos – celebrities.. if you want to be cool etc
    Kairos – play the add in Australia during winter to attract Aussies- only in California can you have sun all the time (skateboarding, sun tanning)
    Australian ad
    Ethos – Australia will provide relief from your stressful life
    (and by ethos, we meant pathos)
    Logos – outdoors and new/indiginous cultures benefits your health and relationships
    benefit*
    karios: natural setting, that draws you away from winter into summer
    Stereotypes
    California people are always surfing and at the beach, LA/hollywood is full of rich/famous people
    Australia is full of wildlife, rugby
    Slang 🙂
    chat – disgusting person
    chime
    rachet
    lads lass’s
    essays
    eshays*
    timewise
    hella – norcal slang
    northern california
    socal
    The Australia group calls Freshman year 1st year, etc.

  93. Breanna,Helen,Phong says:

    Hey guys, here’s our bit 🙂
    We came to the conclusion that when advertisements are composed, they are done so to appeal to the preconceived ideas of an audience.

    We found it easy to understand each others accents but slang words needed to be explained sometimes.

    the most interesting part of our conversation was when we realised the massive difference between tuition costs- it’s almost 10 times more expensive than the average Australian student pays a year!
    We also enjoyed seeing the cultural artefacts, they were really American compared to ours.

    it was great meeting you guys 🙂

  94. Allira Smith-Connor says:

    our group learnt that both commercials has a lot of fallacies in them, especially stereotyping. Both USYD and Stanford agreed that the videos weren’t an accurate portrail of our respective cultures but rather they focused on the stereotypes of them. We also agreed that fallacies weren’t really a concern of the directors of the ads as their target audience weren’t likely to sit down and analyse the commercial. Both focused on the theme of ‘escape your life’. Both had a lot of pathos and the American ad had a lot of ethos however neither ad had much logos.

    in terms of communication, we learnt that in order to communicate effectively, you have to be open minded and ready to have any preconceived stereotypes challenged. Also to view the opposing culture without judgement.

    For both usyd and stanford, the most suprising moment was the differences between time it took to get to uni/college. Stanford students, as freshmen, had to live on campus while syd students can take up to if not longer than 2hrs of travel to get to campus.

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