Category Archives: CCR exchange: Student Research

Online anonymity

This post was written by Paolo Gabriel, a student in the Stanford’s Winter 2011 Networked Rhetoric class; it was designed to focus in on a particular source or research experience related to his project on social media and digital culture … Continue reading

Posted in CCR exchange: Student Research, Networked Rhetoric: Section 2, Stanford Networked Rhetorics class | 7 Comments

4chan: A primordial soup for virtual organic art

This post was written by a student in the Stanford’s Winter 2011 Networked Rhetoric class; it was designed to focus in on a particular source or research experience related to his project on social media and digital culture .  See a … Continue reading

Posted in CCR exchange: Student Research, Networked Rhetoric: Section 2, Stanford Networked Rhetorics class | 6 Comments

‘The Zen of Social Media Marketing’

In my Networked Rhetoric class at Stanford, my research project looks into the world of social media marketing.  Specifically, I’d like to look at how social media marketing is useful for profit-based companies.  However, this general topic is too large … Continue reading

Posted in CCR exchange: Student Research, Networked Rhetoric: Section 2, Stanford Networked Rhetorics class | 4 Comments

The Internet and the Written Word: World War Three?

Alexa Crandall is a sophomore English major at Stanford University. This blog entry refers to a research assignment for a PWR 2 course in the winter term of 2011. “Extra! Extra! Read all about it!”  We hear this exclamation and … Continue reading

Posted in CCR exchange: Student Research, Networked Rhetoric: Section 2, Stanford Networked Rhetorics class | 3 Comments

Video Games: 21st Century Classrooms

This post was written by a student in the Stanford’s Winter 2011 Networked Rhetoric class; it was designed to focus in on a particular source or research experience related to his project on social media and digital culture .  See a … Continue reading

Posted in CCR exchange: Student Research, Networked Rhetoric: Section 1, Stanford Networked Rhetorics class | 4 Comments